Best Practices for Facebook Link Posts

If you’re sick of your Facebook posts getting buried in user Newsfeeds, then check out the two latest changes to the platform that will help you shine amidst Facebook’s ever-changing algorithms. They will help you increase organic reach and make sure your posts are visible by more people.

Links in Posts:

There are three ways to post a link into a Facebook status update. First, one can simply copy and paste the link and Facebook will immediately and automatically create a link preview (with a headline, copy preview and an image from the site). When this happens, one can either keep the link in the update or delete it (without deleting the actual link preview).

Next, a user can post the link only. This follows the same steps as before, however this time you can ‘x’ out of the preview so that only the link URL is shown in your update.

The last way to post a link is to paste the URL in the caption, and then upload a photo separately, so it will show up in your page’s photo album.

Facebook has been running tests to determine which of these three ways to share a link is favored by users. Once they discovered which type of link format their users click on most, Facebook decided to give that one better reach.

The Best Facebook Link Format to Use?

Facebook is constantly running tests to see which type of content users like the best. Once determined, Facebook gives that option better reach. The best Facebook link format to use is the first one: use text and links with a preview to get the most visibility — the default format when you put a link into a status. Note that you can upload your own photo (instead of the automatic selection pulled automatically), to make your post even more visually appealing.

Remember: When sharing a link in a status update, use a link preview. If sharing a photo, don’t include a link in the caption.

Successful Link Sharing on Facebook

Is This the End of the Facebook Era?

End of the Facebook Era

Although Facebook is one of the largest social networks in the world, it’s slowly losing its popularity. Any decline of such a big company is bound to occur over time, yet it’s interesting to note what the company is doing in response. Little, if nothing.

As many bloggers and tech-analysts will agree, once a large social movement like Facebook becomes so engrained in our everyday life that it is no longer unique or special, it will soon become extinct. It’s simply the nature of the game.

As stated by Facebook CFO David Ebersam a few months ago, Facebook is starting to lose it’s teen demographic around the world. They’re no longer on Facebook, but rather on other instant gratification sites likes Vine, Instagram, Snapchat and WeChat. But it’s not just teenagers who are leaving the FB giant, it’s the millennial generation as well, who can’t handle crazy, over-stimulated Newsfeeds with everyone on it, from their students to their and grandmothers.

It’s clear that Facebook wants its users to continue sharing more and more. But if what we post on our Facebook walls never gets seen by our friends (thanks to many, many algorithm changes), what is the point? Specifically as it relates to companies, Facebook recently admitted that brands will need to start paying for such visibility in order to break through the clutter of the typical FB fan’s Newsfeed. This extra demand of companies is causing quite the stir as it’s not clearly stated how boosting will actually get stories into Newfeeds — and by how much.

After all is said and done, Facebook has not come out with any life-changing additions to the platform (if you don’t count auto-playing video ads). Yes, they’ve acquired popular platforms like Instagram, but they’ll have to do a lot more to stay relevant in people’s lives. Although Facebook will most likely survive, the “Facebook Era” may be coming to an end.

— Samantha

Facebook Changes News Feed Algorithm (Again)

Ready for Facebook’s latest update? This week, the platform tweaked the algorithm behind the Newsfeed function with the intent of bringing higher quality content like news stories, to the top of the feed.

As you may have noticed, posts from friends that received engagement like comments or shares, automatically rise to the top of a user’s Newsfeed, even if that user has already seen the content before. Facebook is essentially ensuring that one sees conversations between friends and will engage with the post as well.

Memes and other low quality content will be pushed down on one’s Newsfeed which will impact what type of content marketers use with their fans in the future. Brands will need to think strategically before posting lighter content as Facebook is attempting to keep fans on the site (especially on the mobile version), rather than clicking on a meme or other pieces of content hosted elsewhere.

Additionally, more and more platforms are competing with Twitter as the main platform where fans receive timely news. Specifically speaking, Facebook will begin suggesting specific news stories based on what content a user clicks (see example above). Similar to pushing high quality high on the Newsfeed, recommending content that a user might like will potentially keep users on Facebook more frequently and for longer periods of time, allowing them to see more ads, suggested posts, etc.

Facebook Recommended Stories

Overall, we’re curious to see what content rises to the top of our Newsfeeds — and whether or not it’ll make us engage more with our friend’s content and the platform in general.

Tell us: Have you noticed the new changes on the Newsfeed?

— Samantha